Submissions

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Submission Preparation Checklist

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.
  • The submission has not been previously published, nor is it before another journal for consideration (or an explanation has been provided in Comments to the Editor).
  • The submission file is in OpenOffice, Microsoft Word, or RTF document file format.
  • Where available, URLs for the references have been provided.
  • The text is single-spaced; uses a 12-point font; employs italics, rather than underlining (except with URL addresses); and all illustrations, figures, and tables are placed within the text at the appropriate points, rather than at the end.
  • The text adheres to the stylistic and bibliographic requirements outlined in the Author Guidelines.

Author Guidelines

ORIGINAL SCIENTIFIC ARTICLES

Philosophy and Society regularly publishes Original Scientific Articles. All articles submitted to Philosophy and Society must conform to the following rules.

 

Length of Text

Articles should be between 5.000 and 10.000 words in length (excluding the abstract, key words, and footnotes).

Abstract

Between 100 and 250 words.

Key Words

Up to 10 key words.

Name and Affiliation

Full name and affiliation of the author.

Referencing Style

Philosophy and Society uses The American Sociological Association (ASA) Referencing Style. Citations are provided within the text. All citations in the text must be included in a separate section entitled “References.” The list of references should be formatted with a hanging indentation by 1 cm. All references should be listed in alphabetical order by the (first) author’s last name. Multiple works by the same author should be ordered by the year of publication with the earliest year of publication appearing first. Use six underscores and a period (______.) in place of the name(s) for second and succeeding occurrences of works by the same author. It is the author’s responsibility to ensure that publication information for each entry is complete and correct.

 

Detailed Referencing Style (with examples): 

BOOKS

In the List of References: Author 1 (last name inverted), Author 2 (last name is not inverted), and Author 3 (last name is not inverted). Year of Publication. Name of Publication. Publisher’s City, State (if applicable, in abbreviated form): Publisher’s Name. (If a book has more than three authors, use: Author 1 (last name inverted) et al. Year of Publication. Name of Publication. Publisher’s City, State (if applicable, in abbreviated form): Publisher’s Name.)

Example: Moriarty, Michael. 2003. Early Modern French Thought: The Age of Suspicion. Oxford: Oxford University Press. / Bourdieu, Pierre, and Jean Claude Passeron. 1977. Reproduction in Education, Society and Culture. London: Sage Publications. / Parsons, Talcott, Robert Freed Bales, and Edward Shils. 1981. Working Papers in the Theory of Action. Westport, CT: Greenwood.

In the Text: (Last Name of Author(s) Year of Publication: Page Number(s)).

Example: (Moriarty 2003: 33). / (Bourdieu and Passeron 1977: 22).

In a Footnote: Last Name of Author(s) (Year of Publication: Page Number(s)).

Example: Moriarty (2003: 33). / Bourdieu and Passeron (1977: 22).

 

JOURNAL ARTICLE

In the List of References: Author 1 (Last name inverted), Author 2 (including full last name, last name is not inverted), and Author 3. Year of Publication. “Title of Article.” Name of Publication Volume Number (Issue Number, if applicable): Page Numbers.

Example: Forst, Rainer. 2017. “Political Liberalism: A Kantian View.” Ethics 128 (1): 123–144.

In the Text: (Last Name of Author(s) Year of Publication: Page Number(s)).

Example: (Forst 2017: 125).

In a Footnote: Last Name of Author(s) (Year of Publication: Page Number(s)).

Example: Forst (2017: 125).

 

EDITED BOOKS

In the List of References: Author 1 (last name inverted), Author 2 (last name is not inverted), and Author 3 (last name is not inverted), ed./eds. Year of Publication. Name of Publication. Publisher’s City, State (if applicable, in abbreviated form): Publisher’s Name.

Example: Harris, John, ed. 2001. Bioethics. Oxford: Oxford University Press. / Ben-Moshe, Liat, Chris Chapman, and Allison C. Carey, eds. 2014. Disability Incarcerated: Imprisonment and Disability in the United States and Canada. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

In the Text: (Last Name of Author(s) Year of Publication: Page Number(s)).

Example: (Harris 2001: 30). / (Ben-Moshe, Chapman, and Carey 2014: 58).

In a Footnote: Last Name of Author(s) (Year of Publication: Page Number(s)).

Example: Harris (2001: 30). / Ben-Moshe, Chapman, and Carey (2014: 58).

 

ARTICLES/CHAPTERS IN A BOOK

In the List of References: Author 1 (last name inverted), Author 2 (including full last name, last name is not inverted), and Author 3. Year of Publication. “Title of Article.” In: Book Author (last name inverted), ed. Name of Publication. Publisher’s City, State (if applicable, in abbreviated form): Publisher’s Name, pp.: Page Number(s).

Example: Dworkin, Gerard. 2015. “Defining Paternalism.” In: Schramme, Thomas, ed. New Perspectives on Paternalism and Health Care. Cham: Springer Verlag: pp.: 17–29.

In the Text: (Last Name of Author(s) Year of Publication: Page Number(s)).

Example: (Dworkin 2015: 20).

In a Footnote: Last Name of Author(s) (Year of Publication: Page Number(s)).

Example: Dworkin (2015: 20).

 

WEB-SITES

Texts obtained from the Internet follow the same pattern as those cited above, with the exception that page numbers are omitted and the URL as well as the last date of access are included.

In the List of References: Author 1 (last name inverted), Author 2 (last name is not inverted), and Author 3 (last name is not inverted). Year of Publication. “Title of Article.” URL: Web Address (last accessed: Month Day, Year).

Example: Ross, Kelley. 1996. “Ontological Undecidability.” URL: http://www.friesian.com undecd-1.htm (last accessed: April 2, 2019).

In the Text: (Last Name of Author(s) Year of Publication).

Example: (Ross 1996). 

In a Footnote: Last Name of Author(s) (Year of Publication).

Example: Ross (1996).

 

NEWSPAPER AND MAGAZINES ARTICLE

In the List of References: Author 1 (last name inverted), Author 2 (last name is not inverted), and Author 3 (last name is not inverted). Year of Publication. “Title of Article.” Title of Newspaper, Month and Day of Publication. URL: Web Address (last accessed: Month Day, Year).

Example: Gibbs, Nancy. 1999. “Noon in the Garden of Good and Evil: The Tragedy at Columbine Began As a Crime Story But Is Becoming a Parable.” Time, May 17. URL: https://content.time.com/time/subscriber/article/0,33009,990982,00.html (last accessed: April 2, 2023). 

In the Text: (Last Name of Author(s) Year of Publication: Page Number(s)).

Example: (Gibbs 1999). 

In a Footnote: Last Name of Author(s) (Year of Publication).

Example: Gibbs (1999).

 

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BOOK REVIEWS

In addition to original scientific articles, Philosophy and Society also publishes Book Reviews. Book reviews must conform to the following rules:

  • Books under review should not be published more than three years ago.
  • Book reviews should be written in English or another world language.
  • Book reviews are not subject to the double-blind peer review process, but editorial interventions are possible.
  • Book reviews should be between 1.000 and 2.000 words in length.

 

General Guidelines:

What is a book review?

A book review seeks to inform scholars about the book’s topic, the quality of the book’s argumentation and to explain the book's contribution to the existing literature. A book review does not have to be exclusively positive; it may also indicate some key shortcomings or important disagreements with the author.

 

What should a book review contain?

A book review should include the following:

1) Information about the book (author, title, publication place, publication house, publication date)

2) Name and surname as well as the affiliation of the book-reviewer

3) The text of the book review which should include the following:

(a) a short introductory paragraph which presents the main thesis and organization of the book, as well as its place in the existing literature

(b) summary, analysis and/or critique of the book's main arguments

(c) a short concluding paragraph in which authors may answer the following questions: what are the main advantages and disadvantages of the book? Is the book written in a clear way? Does the book author refer to the relevant existing literature on the topic? Would you recommend the book and to whom?

 

What a book review should not contain?

A book review is not a review article. Therefore, citing other authors as well as using highly technical language is strongly discouraged. The book review should be concise and written in a clear way.

 

For further information about book reviews, please consult the Editorial Team at: journal@ifdt.bg.ac.rs.

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